Mulberry Ice Cream

Mulberry Ice Cream // The Sugar Hit

 

There are not nearly enough purple foods. It’s such an enticing colour. It’s why grape-flavoured things seem so awesome (and often are). Ice cream is no exception to this rule. Just as I was drawn to the ‘rainbow’ flavoured ice cream as a kid (it was legit vanilla ice cream, just dyed), so am I drawn to all the magical shades in the ice cream arsenal now.

 

The only difference is that I could do without the food colouring, especially since nature offers so many delicious and beautiful ways to add colour, pizazz AND flavour naturally. Enter, the mulberry.

 

Mulberry Ice Cream // The Sugar Hit

 

I’m on a who-knows-how-long mulberry bender, which started with me eating them straight from the tree (literally last year), then freezing our whole crop, and now finally getting around to using them. First there was this Mulberry Mess; a fine and decadent dessert. And now there’s the gorgeous purple ice cream you see in front of you.

 

The vibrancy of colour and flavour you get in this recipe is pretty epic, considering there’s only a cup of mulberries in the whole batch. Which is great because mulberries are hard to find in stores, and so my tree’s worth is pretty precious to me.

 

Mulberry Ice Cream // The Sugar Hit

 

All is not lost, however, if you can’t get any mulbs. This recipe works wonderfully as a blueprint for any berry ice cream – blueberry, blackberry, raspberry or cherry or even BOYSENBERRIES if you can get your hands on them (they’re even harder to find than mulberries in my experience).

 

The recipe technique, of course, comes from Jeni Britton Bauer – and it makes the best and easiest homemade ice cream ever.

 

Mulberry Ice Cream // The Sugar Hit

 

A dripping scoop of this ice cream, smudged between two digestive biscuits is a pretty awesome thing. The sweet, creamy, berry-fragrant ice cream takes on a cheesecake-y edge next to the buttery crunch of a cookie.

 

But this would be just as great served with more berries and a dollop of whipped cream, and hey why not crumble over a meringue to make a kind of mulberry-meringue-mess-sundae? Or just put a scoop in a cone and take an artsy instagram photo with your sunglasses on? Whatever, you do you! And enjoy it!

 

xx Sarah.

 

Mulberry Ice Cream // The Sugar HitMulberry Ice Cream // The Sugar Hit

Mulberry Ice Cream
 
A beautiful, vibrant, bright-purple mulberry ice cream.
Author:
Serves: 1 litre/2 pints
Ingredients
for the berries:
  • 1 cup mulberries
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste
for the ice cream base:
  • 2 cups (500ml) milk
  • 2 tbsp cornflour
  • 3 tbsp cream cheese
  • pinch of salt.
  • 1 + ¼ cup (310ml) cream (heavy whipping/double cream)
  • ⅔ cup (150g) caster sugar
  • 2 tbsp glucose syrup
Instructions
  1. Place the berries and sugar into a small saucepan and cook over a low heat, stirring, until the berries wilt and give up their juice (about 5 minutes if frozen).
  2. Press the mixture through a sieve into a small bowl, making sure to get all the juice, and stir in the vanilla. Discard the seeds.
  3. Take 2 tbsp of the milk and mix with the cornflour in a small bowl.
  4. Place the cream cheese and salt into a large mixing bowl, and beat until smooth. Slowly whisk in the berry puree, making sure there no lumps.
  5. Place the remaining milk, the cream, sugar and glucose into a large saucepan over a medium heat, and bring up to a full rolling boil. Boil for 4 minutes, then remove from the heat, and whisk in the cornflour mixture.
  6. Place back on the heat for a minute, or until the mixture thickens.
  7. Remove from the heat, and slowly whisk the thickened cream mix into the cream cheese and berry mix. Leave to cool slightly, and then cover and chill completely in the fridge (at least four hours of overnight).
  8. Churn in an ice cream machine according to the manufacturer's instructions.
 

Mulberry Ice Cream // The Sugar Hit

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